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the region is in for a long. of time of change the central or eastern europe -- long period of time of change than central or eastern europe faced. the main argument is, it is upon us, and more change is coming. some of that will include islamist forces and the need to figure out how to best use our power to shape and influence their transition. >> on to rob. >> a couple of closing points. first, generally we tend to project exceed a certain bigotry of low expectations on muslims in the arab cultural world. those of us who are various religious faiths here know the extent to which we practice our faith is and how faithful we are to this or that religious prescription. we know that we fall pretty short, but we think, muslims all pray five times a day, they never touched a scotch. they all do every commandment in islam. and they submit to the will of their local imam, et cetera. it does not work that way. moslem practice in general is not so different than general practice here. muslims want the political the way that we want to be political. let us not fall prey to the bigotry of low expectati
a sense of europe. they have got to find a way to work out all of their differences to save the euro. i believe they will. you can see it and feel it. they will find a way. they will muddle through, but they will find a way to get it done. these countries are also looking to us. test included a discarding of the old nation of communique's on issues about which we disagreed and patched over with language that was always misinterpreted and establishment of the arms control, human rights and -- human rights, arms control, regional issues and bi-la salle rail -- bilateral issues. it meant we didn't trade one interest for another. it was interesting how quickly people would say if the soviet union does something we don't like let's make them pay with a u.s. interest. as we got away with that with the new negotiating approach and made our way to geneva, we arrived with some sense of things being very different in the soviet union. one of the preparatory trips we had met with the one member who said, you know, as new leaders when we got to be in charge the cupboard was bare. i'm not sure a lot
% of their graduates are in those fields. europe is at 24%. america is at 167% of your graduates. -- 16% of your graduates. as important as creating the kind of human talent that is needed in these key files that will drive innovation, then you know we're in trouble. i would correct one comment, there has been some of us chris on the democratic side and marco rubio and a senator from kansas we have put forward legislation long before the election that said let's look at this tall lent competition issue and put forward an approach that many of us, those of us from the business world that have been talking about for decades. while we recognize we need to do more to prime the pump in terms of science graduates, native born americans particularly but focus on losing the numbers in middle school on girls and minorities. we also have to continue to attract talent from around the world. one of the ways we can can and will is if we change our visa policies. as a matter of fact, if we had visa policies and immigration policies in effect in the 1970's and 1980's that we had now we would not have had the g
traveled to 15 countries over the last four years. i told these companies that built the rails in europe and asia, come to america. invest in america. many of them are here now. in the absence of congress not providing the money but the leadership of the president's providing the money, we would get there with public money. until we do, we will use private dollars. >> with all respect, there is not 50 minutes worth of vision in this congress. the chairman likes to exclude himself. i very much respect and i believe it is the way to proceed not to give up on high-speed rail. i beg you not to get up. -- giv eup. e up. if you continue to flake this money out, it in the end there will be huge criticism of the administration for having nothing to show for a bond. above is a possible for you to think you're a fiscal priority based on a real time vision of what lies ahead for us in the next five years so that we might prioritized among these projects which for example have state go ahead. the projects were you see an opportunity for private sector funding. on some rational basis, we're going to
to fall behind europe in most studies in terms of the outcomes. i think about what is different -- we are investing a boat load. are we going to see anywhere near the delivery services? i would like to see us be the global leader. >> there are certainly challenges in that area. a couple of them are you look at the demographics -- most of the damage -- health care in the country is delivered by medical groups of less than five practitioners. it is like the cadre in government -- they are all middle-aged and above. like trying to imagine we're going to run a food delivery system by a network of corner stores. certainly there are challenges, but the confluence of where citizens are looking, the need, the availability -- it is an arena. >> i think it will be in three core areas -- national security, we are you see things become less encumbered and less partisan. also, driven as much by local government as anything. third, we have not talked about education. the reason i think education, there is a tremendous amount of untapped research in sight that makes sense -- i should not say makes s
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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